Shiva

Rishabadeva & Amman Set
 
The relationship between Parvati and Shiva represents the eternal tension in Hinduism between the mystic and the domestic. Until Parvati enters his life, Shiva leads the ascetic life of a sage, meditating motionless in the mountain forests. Her mission is to lure Shiva into the world of marriage, sex, children and tempt him away from intense spiritual self-absorption. Parvati breaks into Shiva's mystic world by becoming as austere as he, to the extent other gods fear her intensity will generate enough heat to scorch not only themselves but the entire world. The gods persuade Shiva to accept Parvati as his bride so she will cease her efforts. As Shiva's wife, Parvati upholds the order of dharma and it is she who represents the beauty and attraction of wordly, sexual life, who cherishes the home and society rather then the ascetic life. Parvati civilises Shiva with her presence. She domesticates him and in so doing, enables him to become accessible to the mortal worshipper.
 
Shiva
 
Shiva (also spelt Siva, also called Hara) is a Hindu god. He is the third god of the Trimurti (popularly called the "Hindu trinity"). In the trimurti, Shiva is the destroyer, while Brahma and Vishnu are creator and preserver, respectively. However, even though he represents destruction, he is viewed as a positive force (The Destroyer of Evil), since creation follows on from destruction. Some Hindus believe in a legend that he came from an egg laid by Ammavaru while others say he is anadi (without beginning/birth) and ananth (without end/death). Shivas worshippers are called Shaivaites. Shiva is the chief god of Shaivism, one of the two main branches of Hinduism today (the other being Vaishnavism). His abode is called Kailasa. His holy mount (called vahana in Sanskrit) is Nandi, the Bull. His attendant is named Bhadra. He is usually represented by a phallus, the Shiva linga (or lingam).